Tony Foley Analysis of Betting Tax
Comprehensive paper on the effect of various types of betting duty on a sector which contributes heavily to Irish exchequer

Click here to read analysis paper prepared by Tony Foley, Head of Economics, DCU

Budget Submission 2012
Please click on link if you would like to read our Budget 2012 Submission

Click here for Budget Submission 2012

Reform of Gambling Laws: Submission to Department of Justice
The Casino Gaming Control Section Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform September 09

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Response to Labour proposals;

The Irish Bookmakers Association have said that the recently published proposals for reform of betting from the Labour Party would, if implemented, pose a number of significant difficulties for the sector.

We have, however, welcomed the document as an important contribution to a debate that should take place on reform of betting and racing in Ireland today.

The key points made by the IBA are: Read More….


David Jennings – Davy Stockbrokers

“Consolidation is badly needed in the sector and there is excess capacity. But businesses should thrive or fail based on the quality of their management and not on the failings of an inequitable tax system.”

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Assessment of Budget 2009 – Jim Power M.Econ.Sc

Decision to Increase Betting Tax from 1% to 2% By Jim Power, M.Econ.Sc

The Betting Industry is suggesting that the measure could force the closure of 300 betting offices around the country. This argument looks solid, because it is clear that the domestic bettingĀ  industry is already facing serious competition from forms of betting that do not come within the tax net, such as the medium of the internet. The 1% betting tax already places the domestic industry at a competitive disadvantage, and the decision to double the tax compounds the situation.

PJudge clears bookmakers of running “illegal cartel”

Jon Lees – Racing Post, 06 Nov 2008

THE major bookmakers were on Thursday cleared by a High Court judge of running an “illegal cartel” by boycotting TurfTV, the rival racecourse betting shop service.

Mr Justice Morgan ruled that there was no unlawful concerted practice by Coral, Ladbrokes, William Hill and Betfred to refuse to purchase TurfTV.

All the firms except Betfred eventually took the service set up by Amalgamated Racing (AMRAC) in a joint venture on behalf of 31 of the 60 UK racecourses.

The judge also rejected claims of unlawful collusion over decisions by some bookmakers to withdraw sponsorship from certain races.

In a bitterly contested multi-million-poundaction in which AMRAC were earlier cleared of illegal price fixing, the judge has now ruled that the betting shops had also done nothing unlawful.